PREAMBLE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION: (Editorialized in Red)

We the PEOPLE of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare [not "deem" a dole caring citizen's rights not welcare] , and secure the blessings of liberty to OURSELVES and OUR POSTERITY [the children - citizen's children], do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."

ARTICLE I, Legislative Department

Section 2.5 Officers; impeachment

Representatives shall choose their speaker and other officers, [no mention of surrendering to committee chairmen] and shall have the sole power of IMPEACHMENT.

Section 4 Congressional Elections and Meetings

4. Adjournment.

Neither house, during the session of Congress, without the consent of Congress, shall, without the consent of the other [members], adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses shall be sitting [excluding closed forums and Presidential dinners]

Section 6 Privileges and Disabilities of Members

2. Holding other offices prohibited.[committee chair? or member]

No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which he was elected [as member of Congress], be APPOINTED TO ANY CIVIL OFFICE UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE UNITED STATES [committee chair?], which shall have been created or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time; and no person holding any office under the United States shall be a member of either house during his continuance in office. [special interest forums, LOBBY LUNCHES, BLACK CAUCUS, HISPANIC CAUCUS, PURPOSE CAUCUS, joint committees - collaborations - alliances?]

Section 7 Procedure for Passing Laws

1. Revenue bills

All bills for RAISING REVENUE [like penalties for illegals/invaders s-2611, s-1348, s-1639] shall originate in the HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVE, [NOT THE SENATE, s- bills] but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments [of a house bill hr-] as on other bills [in process in the HOUSE].

2. How bills become laws.

Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate shall, before it become law, be presented to the President of the United States; if he approves he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his objection, to that house in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsideration, two-thirds [division settlement] of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together with the objection, to the other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But in all such cases the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted[ - no mention of holidays - Fridays universally off]) after it shall have been presented to him [not her - inferring male no same-sex and changing this requiring a constitutional amendment], the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall not become law. [Note: why then can a "simple majority" or 60 votes in the Senate not 67 be the requirement for division settlements?]

Section 8 Powers Delegated to Congress [to act]

11. To declare war [not the President], grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water [GITMO - ABUGRAB - NOT the PRESIDENT];

15. To provide for calling forth the militia [of each respective state - not the President] to execute the laws of the Union [protect from invasion, provide for the common defense], suppress insurrections [mayors, judges, legislators, enforcement personnel refusing to execute laws, parades of massive invaders], and repel invasions [SEND INVADERS BACK, SEIZE THEIR ASSETS AND OCCUPIED TERRITORY AND POSSESSIONS]

18. Implied powers.

To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper [according to the moral laws herein traditional, IE the 10 Commandments, and consistent with all provisions of the Preamble and content of the U.S. Constitution with approved, not proposed, whims, expediency for fads, and passions; Amendments to the the Constitution.] for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States or in any department or officer thereof.

Section 9 Limitations upon Powers of Congress

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended [Amendment only or for expediency without due process in each state ratifying first the change in Amendments], unless, when in cases of rebellion or INVASIONS, the PUBLIC SAFETY [preserve "domestic tranquility" "provide for the common defense" no Patriot Act needed...DAY LABOR SITES OF INVADERS, insurgency activities of all kinds to overthrow the government, abuses by officials in misuse of public funds to support invaders], may require it [to effect dealing with the invaders, seditionist rebelling refusing to obey the laws of the land enforce border security and repel invasions; and enemies within and without NOT CITIZENS ABIDING THE LAWS.

One must ask since there is no INVASION according to Congress and the President the Patriot Act is unlawful.

Acknowledging the INVASION and SEDITION makes the Act lawful, duplication but lawful, there is no need for other laws - just repel invasions and protect from invasion, and rebellion by "repelling" invaders, prosectuing the many agents and employees of government participating in the acts of invasions and accompanying sanctuary activities - sedition. If as logically and reasonably an INVASION (being invaded simply or invaders enter for conquest exists), the reasonal prudent view whereby then "anchor babies" cannot exists, children of invaders do not apply since the act is contrary to any provision of "slave children" 1868 circa between the provisions of the 14th Amendment for that generation only to be accommodated as citizens].

8. Titles of nobility prohibited.

No title of nobility [Ruffles and flourishes] shall be granted by the United States; and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept or any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state. [Why doesn't this include "gifts" (emolument), "I am the President" rants by Bush, presumptions of authority, Committee Chairmen's airs and whims subverting established rules, judges activism making laws from personal agendas no precedence nor basis in the U.S. laws in fact et al?]

Section 10 States Under Constitutional Restrictions

1. Absolute prohibitions of the states

No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance or confederation [including establishment of Mexican Consulates and giving ear to their demand or any other foreign power, Governors visiting their land, form "sister" cities and other ] grant letters of marque and reprisal [email, electronic, verbally or in writing in the confines of foreign states or collusions] coin money; emit bills of credit [ibid.]; but make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law [or pre facto grants of privileges to invaders] or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility.

Article III Judicial Department

Section 1 Juridsdiction

"shall hold their office during good behavior [that would not be masterbating under the desk(Clinton) or example or member of subversive groups]"

shall extend "to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls [Mexican consul misbehavior in American government inclusive]

Section 2 Supreme Court

"In all cases affecting public ministers and consuls, and those in which a state be party"

Section 3 Treason

1.  Treason defined; evidence necessary.

Treason [ATTEMPT to overthrow the government] against the United States shall consist only in levying war against them, or in ADHERING TO THEIR ENEMIES [in Mosques or wherever, sancutary rallies, parades, meetings, joining La Raza et al], giving them aid and comfort.  No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses [Border Patrol Agents in Texas?] to the same overt act, or on confession in open court.

Article IV Relations to the States

Section 4 Protection to the States [by each citizen, local governments, and the military forces and resources of the U.S. A. federal government]

The United States shall GUARANTEE to EVERY STATE in this Union [and its CITIZENS THERIN] a republican [REPRESENTATIVE] form of government [NOT DEMOCRATIC], and SHALL PROTECT EACH OF THEM AGAINST INVASION; and, on APPLICATION OF THE LEGISLATURE [of each separate and respective state], OR of the executive [Governor] (when the legislature cannot be convened), against domestic violence [unlawful assemblies by foreign agenst, invaders and foreign military, sanctuary insurgents, rock throwing at the border and entry stations, gang, drugs, slave trafficking, trespassing et al].

Article V The Amending Process

The Constitution, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments to this Constituiton, or, on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either cse, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when reatified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several states, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress; provided that no amendment which may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and forth clauses in the ninth section of the first article; and that no state, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate.

Article VI General Provisions

1. Validity of debts recognized.

All debts contracted and engagement entered into before the adoption of this Constitution shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution as under the Confederation.

2. Supreme law of the land.

This Constitution and the laws of the United States [seperately an individudally] which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United State, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the jduges in every state [legilative and executive branches] shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding [in spite of contrary laws by states to the constitution the Constitution is the Supreme law].

3. Official oath

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support the Constitution [not enter into any alliances with enemies of America, nor plot to undermine her sovereignty, desolve the union, nor make her subserviant to any body politic WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE GOVERNED IN DUE PROCESS]...

Article VII When the Constitution should go into effect.

The ratification of the conventions of nine states shall be sufficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the states so reatifying the same.

 

AMENDMENTS http://72.32.50.200/constitution/constitution.pdf

Amendment I.
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
Amendment II.
A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.
Amendment III.
No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.
Amendment IV.
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affi rmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
Amendment V.
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.
Amendment VI.
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.
Amendment VII.
In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise reexamined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.
Amendment VIII.
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Amendment IX.
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Amendment XI.
Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified February 7, 1795. (Note: A portion of Article III, Section 2 of the Constitution was modified by the 11th Amendment.) The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.
AmendmentXII.
Passed by Congress December 9, 1803. Ratifi ed June 15, 1804. (Note: A portion of Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution was changed by the 12th Amendment.) The Electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted
for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate;-the President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certifi cates and the votes shall then be counted;-The person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if
no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall
be necessary to a choice. [And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in case of the death or other constitutional disability of the President.-]* The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the offi ce of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States. *Superseded by Section 3 of the 20th Amendment.
Amendment XIII.
Passed by Congress January 31, 1865. Ratifi ed December 6, 1865. (Note: A portion of Article IV, Section 2 of the Constitution was changed by the 13th Amendment.)
SECTION 1.
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
SECTION 2.
Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Amendment XIV.
Passed by Congress June 13, 1866. Ratifi ed July 9, 1868. (Note: Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution was modifi ed by Section 2 of the 14th Amendment.)
SECTION 1.
All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
SECTION 2.
Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial offi cers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants
of such State, [being twenty-one years of age,]* and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.
SECTION 3.
No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any offi ce, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an offi cer of the United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial offi cer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.
SECTION 4.
The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void.
SECTION 5.
The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. *Changed by Section 1 of the 26th Amendment.
Amendment XV.
Passed by Congress February 26, 1869. Ratifi ed February 3, 1870.
SECTION 1.
The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Amendment XVI.
Passed by Congress July 2, 1909. Ratifi ed February 3, 1913. (Note: Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution was modifi ed by the 16th Amendment.)
The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.
Amendment XVII.
Passed by Congress May 13, 1912. Ratifi ed April 8, 1913. (Note: Article I, Section 3 of the Constitution was modifi ed by the 17th Amendment.)
The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State shall have the qualifi cations requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislatures. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fi ll such vacancies: Provided, That the legislature of any State may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointments until the people fi ll the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct. This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution.
Amendment XVIII.
Passed by Congress December 18, 1917. Ratifi ed January 16, 1919. Repealed by the 21st Amendment, December 5, 1933.
SECTION 1.
After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.
SECTION 2.
The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
SECTION 3.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratifi ed as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.
Amendment XIX.
Passed by Congress June 4, 1919. Ratifi ed August 18, 1920. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Amendment XX.
Passed by Congress March 2, 1932. Ratifi ed January 23, 1933. (Note: Article I, Section 4 of the Constitution was modified by Section 2 of this Amendment. In addition, a portion of the 12th Amendment was superseded by Section 3.)
SECTION 1.
The terms of the President and the Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratifi ed; and the terms of their successors shall then begin.
SECTION 2.
The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3d day of January, unless they shall by law appoint a different day.
SECTION 3.
If, at the time fi xed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fi xed for the beginning of his term, or if the President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice President elect shall act as President until a President shall have qualifi ed; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President elect nor a Vice President shall have qualifi ed, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice President shall have qualified.
SECTION 4.
The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them.
SECTION 5.
Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October following the ratifi cation of this article.
SECTION 6.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratifi ed as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission.
Amendment XXI.
Passed by Congress February 20, 1933. Ratifi ed December 5, 1933.
SECTION 1.
The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed.
SECTION 2.
The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited.
SECTION 3.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.
Amendment XXII.
Passed by Congress March 21, 1947. Ratifi ed February 27, 1951.
SECTION 1.
No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the offi ce of President more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the offi ce of President when this Article was proposed by Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the offi ce of President, or acting as President, during the term within which this Article becomes operative from holding the offi ce of President or acting as President during
the remainder of such term.
SECTION 2.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratifi ed as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.
Amendment XXIII. Passed by Congress June 16, 1960. Ratifi ed March 29, 1961.
SECTION 1.
The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as Congress may direct: A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article
of amendment.
SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Amendment XXIV.
Passed by Congress August 27, 1962. Ratifi ed January 23, 1964.
SECTION 1.
The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay poll tax or other tax.
SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Amendment XXV.
Passed by Congress July 6, 1965. Ratifi ed February 10, 1967. (Note: Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution was modifi ed by the 25th Amendment.)
SECTION 1.
In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President.
SECTION 2.
Whenever there is a vacancy in the offi ce of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take offi ce upon confi rmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.
SECTION 3.
Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his offi ce, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President.
SECTION 4.
Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal offi cers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his offi ce, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the offi ce as Acting President. Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his offi ce unless the Vice President and a majority of either the principal offi cers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his offi ce. Thereupon Congress shall decide the
issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his offi ce, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President
shall resume the powers and duties of his office.
Amendment XXVI.
Passed by Congress March 23, 1971. Ratifi ed July 1, 1971. (Note: Amendment 14, Section 2 of the Constitution was modifi ed by Section 1 of the 26th Amendment.)
SECTION 1.
The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.
SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Amendment XXVII.
Originally proposed Sept. 25, 1789. Ratifi ed May 7, 1992. No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of representatives shall have intervened.

 

EDITORIAL ON CREEPING GLOBALISM. Waiting for Jesus to return, not trusting the racals in government leaderships yet.

Amendment IX: The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage othters retained BY THE PEOPLE.

Amendmend X: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

 
North American Union (NAU) NOT CONSTITUTIONAL

The NAU is a plan by which President Bush and the leaders of Mexico and Canada agree to combine the three nation, Mexico, Canada, and the U.S. into one country in order allow free flow of people and goods from one country to another (no borders).  The immigration bill which was defeated by the Senate was part of the plan. Another part, which can stand alone, is a corridor system that will go from southern Mexico through the U.S. into southern Canada (see map below).  This corroridor is to be 400 yards wide and be used for highways and natural gas, telephone and electrical lines,

As you can see the corridor will start at Mansanillo and Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico and go north crossing the Mexico/U.S. border west of Houston to Kansas City. It will branch at Kansas City going north to Winnipeg, Canada and going northeast to Montreal, CanadaKansas City will be the first check point. That means explosives, dope, and about anything else can be brought into our country without inspection. 

Bush's plan is to establish tanker ports at Mansanillo and Lazaro Cardenas whereby goods can be shipped from China and other countries to be unloaded at these two ports and transported across Mexico into the U.S. and Canada by trucks driven by Mexican drivers.

There a number of problems with this.  First, the highway is opening the door to the combining of the three nations, which if it should happen, will lower our standard of living and change our way of life. Second, there will be no restrictions on the trucks or drivers who use the highways to meet American standards and will put families who also drive those highways at risk of being killed or injured. Third, it will cause many American truck drivers and also those who work at our American ports on the west coast to lose their jobs.  And fourth. as it is being constructed it will destroy many homes, small businesses, golf courses, schools, hospitals, farms, ranches, etc.

How do we stop the passage of NAU. We need to put pressure on our congressman to oppose the NAU as we did in opposition to the immigration bill. We have the momentum and all we have to do is carry that momentum forward and use our states rights to defeat this unconstitutional plan.

The Oklahoma Legislature has already voted for a two year delay of any property acquisition or construction of the road across their state and the Texas Legislature is considering the same thing.

There is a plan for a similar road across Arizona. Some of our legislators and a group of us Arizona constitutionalists are opposing NAU and you can help by encouraging your legislators to work to stop NAU or you can join with us to stop it. The plan for NAU is something that is not to be taken lightly because much is at risk.


    
'Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.'
~ Thomas Jefferson

(This is why Ted Kennedy, Nancy Pelosi and Hillary Clinton want gun control so badly! )

FIREARMS REFRESHER COURSE

1.  An armed man is a citizen.  An unarmed man is a subject.

2.  A gun in the hand is better than a cop on the phone.

3.  Colt:  The original point and click interface.

4.  Gun control is not about guns; it's about control.

5.  If guns are outlawed, can we use swords?

6.  If guns cause crime, then pencils cause misspelled words.

7.  Free men do not ask permission to bear arms.

8.  If you don't know your rights, you don't have any.

9.  Those who trade liberty for security have neither.

10.  The United States Constitution (c)1791.  All Rights Reserved.

11.  What part of 'shall not be infringed' do you not understand?

12.  The Second Amendment is in place in case the politicians ignore the others.

13.  64,999,987 firearms owners killed no one yesterday.

14.  Guns only have two enemies; rust and politicians.

15.  Know guns, know peace, know safety.  No guns, no peace, no safety.

16.  You don't shoot to kill; you shoot to stay alive.

17.  911:  Government sponsored Dial-a-Prayer.

18.  Assault is a behavior, not a device.

19.  Criminals love gun control; it makes their jobs safer.

20.  If guns cause crime, then matches cause arson.

21.  Only a government that is afraid of its citizens tries to control them.

22.  You have only the rights you are willing to fight for.

23.  Enforce the gun control laws we ALREADY have; don't make more.

24.  When you remove the people's right to bear arms, you create slaves.

25.  The American Revolution would never have happened with gun control.